Int'l Collaborations

BtC Flip Teaching

In the 2nd semester of the 107th academic year (2018-2019), IPCS introduced Climate Change: Issues and Solutions: Earth's Sharp Turn, a course incorporating a Flipped Learning curriculum from the University of California called Bending the Curve: Climate Change Solutions (BtC). The course covers 18 topics, including basic knowledge of climate change and sustainable development, and local examples. Students are required to watch and read relevant course materials online before class, which they subsequently present and discuss in class. Starting from the 1st semester of the 108th academic year (2019-2020), this course was integrated with the original required course on global environmental issues and countermeasures to become a 4-credit compulsory course entitled Climate Change: Issues and Solutions.

Course Objectives

Students of different academic and cultural backgrounds are encouraged to respond to current climate change-related issues through group discussions and sharing of opinions. In addition to allowing students to understand interdisciplinary ideas, this course aims to cultivate a new generation of talents with climate change literacy in Taiwan.

Course Introduction

Unlike the usual lecture-based courses at NTU, this course has two important features:
1. A systematic approach that leads students to understand important issues in the field of climate change, from the causes of climate change, to social issues such as climate justice, to scientific, technical, and policy-based solutions.
2.

Students must watch the weekly designated course videos before class, and discuss, organize and share ideas during class.

In the 1st semester of the 108th academic year (2019-2020), the University of California officially authorized IPCS to use the BtC online teaching materials. The initial interdisciplinary course Global Environmental Issues and Countermeasures, after the addition of the BtC materials, was renamed into Climate Change: Issues and Solutions. This course is currently divided into 18 topics, including science, society, energy, politics, science and technology, and their relevance to climate change or sustainable development. It discusses how to achieve climate change adaptation or mitigation in different aspects, and provides unique cases and experiences in various locations for teachers and students to refer to and discuss in the classroom. The design of this “flipped classroom” helps both students and teachers to understand different perspectives on climate change actions, and through classroom discussions, enables them to understand the shortcomings of their own respective fields. Ultimately, an interdisciplinary connection on the theme of climate change is achieved.

Learning Outcomes

There are three main types of in-class discussions:

1. Information Inquiry & Reporting

For newer terms or deeper issues such as scientific aspects, students research the information and present brief in-class reports. This process of collecting information not only allows students to develop their knowledge on the various issues, but also trains them to organize the collected data and extract the context and key points within a small amount of time.


Figure 1. In-class presentation mode

2. Roleplay

For social science-related issues such as international negotiations, the classroom design allows students to play the roles of different stakeholders, for example, representatives from various countries or heads of organizations. They are tasked with negotiating a common issue, such as cooperating on an international carbon reduction plan, or investing in a national development plan.

Figure 2. Simulation of international climate negotiations.


Figure 3. Students discuss after classroom activity.

3. Strategy Discussion

Students are encouraged to respond to current climate change-related issues through group discussions and sharing of opinions. In addition to allowing students to understand interdisciplinary ideas, this course aims to cultivate a new generation of talents with climate change literacy in Taiwan.


Figure 4. Group discussion of action strategies.


Figure 5. Action strategies developed by students after class discussion.